It seems that every time I lose faith in the human race, something happens that restores it. Last week was one of those weeks. My current roommate moved out, taking her furniture with her. My furniture was being stored in my parents' house in Atlanta, so I borrowed a friend's Suburban and made the drive last weekend.

During my stay, I happened to make a great find at an antiques dealer -- a cherry wood china cabinet in good condition at a low price. I had to get it. We loaded it into my aunt's van and drove it back to my parents' house, where my Dad and uncle tried to load it into the Suburban.

What seemed like an easy task became daunting when we realized only one of the back doors would open.

Several of my parents' neighbors drove by, witnessing my Dad and uncle hoisting the cabinet on their shoulders and trying to load it. No one stopped. After about 10 or 15 minutes, about the time we were going to give up, a teenager delivering pizzas in the neighborhood stopped his truck to help. At first he offered his truck to us, thinking we would be taking the cabinet to another place in town. When we told him I was taking it to Valdosta, he offered to help push the cabinet in. Within a couple of minutes (and a couple of tries) Dad, my uncle and the young man pushed the cabinet in. My mom tried to give the young man some money for his trouble, but he waved her hand away.

"Just doing my good deed for the day," he said, got in his truck, and left. I don't know the name of the young man, or his motives for helping, but we were truly grateful. Here is this person, on the job, who stopped, possibly making a pizza late, possibly losing tips, to help strangers for nothing.

It is moments like these that make me rethink my opinions of our society. Every day, more and more people get sucked into the "Me" generation -- "I" am important, "I" must do for "myself" -- and the number of people who want to do good for others dwindles. It is a sad fact, because older generations worked together to accomplish something for the common good and for their neighbors. My grandparents, even my parents, look at the younger generations and see an increasingly selfish group.I also see a selfish society, and I get sucked into it at times. But when I am reminded that one person cannot possibly do everything by himself or herself, and how good it is to get help sometimes, I realize that giving help and serving others as they do you, is worth more than its weight in gold. It is something that should be taken to heart.

Helping others is more than an obligation, but should be a duty. That teenager reminded me that kindness is so important for our morale, and I hope to be more like him and help others out.

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