• Meth is considered even more addictive than heroin.

• Meth is sometimes referred to as “Speed,” “Chalk,” “Ice,” “Crystal,” “Glass,” “Crank,” “Yaba,” “Fire,” “Tina,” and “Tweak.”

• Meth can “turn off” the brain’s ability to produce dopamine, leaving users unable to experience any kind of pleasure from anything other than more and more Meth.

• Meth can be swallowed, snorted, smoked, or injected. Depending on the method of intake, the high from Meth can last from six to 24 hours.

• Meth is derived from amphetamine and is commonly made using the base chemicals ephedrine or pseudoephedrine found in over-the-counter medicines. Other common household products added to the manufacture of Meth include acetone (nail polish remover), iodine, anhydrous ammonia (fertilizer), hydrochloric acid (pool chemicals), lithium (batteries), red phosphorus (matches or road flares), sodium hydroxide (lye), sulfuric acid (drain cleaner), and toluene (brake fluid).

• Meth users are often seduced by the intensity of the initial high — a high many say is unlike anything they have experienced before. Almost immediately, users build up a tolerance for the drug, causing them to vary the quantity, frequency, or method of intake in an effort to recreate that first experience.

Long-term Meth abuse may result in many damaging effects, including violent behavior, anxiety, confusion, insomnia, paranoia, auditory hallucinations, mood disturbances and delusions (for example, the sensation of insects crawling on the skin). Chronic use frequently leads to symptoms such as neurotoxicity (brain damage), respiratory problems, irregular heartbeat, and irreversible damage to blood vessels in the brain — producing strokes, heart and kidney damage, cardiovascular collapse, and death.

Source: The Georgia Meth Project.

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