Valdosta Daily Times

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November 27, 2013

France to send 1,000 troops to Central African Republic

DAKAR, Senegal — France promised Tuesday to send 1,000 troops to Central African Republic amid warnings about the potential for genocide in the near-anarchic former French colony.

Whether the French forces will save lives largely depends on how far the foreign soldiers venture outside the capital, Bangui, to the lawless provinces where mostly Muslim rebels have been attacking Christian villages, and Christian militias have recently launched retaliatory attacks.

The French move comes less than a week after French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius warned “the country is on the verge of genocide” and marks the second time this year that France has sent troops to a former colony in Africa.

In January, thousands of French soldiers launched an offensive to free northern Mali’s major towns from the control of al-Qaida-linked militants. After that success, the French military is stepping up its efforts in Central African Republic, a lawless country in the heart of the continent.

No other country is expected to take action if France, the former colonial power, doesn’t get involved, said Francois Heisbourg, a French analyst at the Foundation for Strategic Research think tank in Paris. “We are a prisoner of history and geography: This is our neighborhood, and yes, we have troops in the area for historical reasons,” Heisbourg said. “And given the humanitarian situation and the political pressure, there is no way we can avoid doing this.”

However, it is not clear how much can be accomplished by 1,000 French troops in a country of 4.6 million people where many roads have not been repaved since independence in 1960. An international presence is needed given the limited capacity of Central African Republic’s own security forces, said Christian Mukosa, a researcher with the Africa division of Amnesty International.

“It’s really very important that the French don’t stay only in Bangui, but go to Bouca and other hot spots where currently there are serious human rights abuses and where populations are at risk,” he said. In the northwest town of Bouca, nun Angelina Santaguiliana said she lives in fear of a rebel attack on her Catholic mission. Already some 2,400 people have sought refuge there in the past week, crowding the floors of the church at night and taking shelter under trees on the mission’s yard.

“If the French come to help with disarmament in our region, it will be a good thing, but if there is fighting it would make things worse,” she said by telephone Tuesday, with the sounds of children wailing in the background.

More than 35,000 other people have sought refuge at another Catholic mission in Bossangoa, according to church officials there.  Central African Republic’s current chaos started late last year when a number of rebel groups joined forces to form the coalition known as Seleka. In March the rebels overthrew the president of a decade and installed their leader in power. But rebel leader-turned-president Michel Djotodia now exerts little control over the renegade fighters in the provinces, most of whom are Muslim and who are accused of committing killings, torture and rape, and forcibly recruiting child soldiers.

France has warned for months about the deteriorating security in Central African Republic, and its pledge follows warnings from the U.N. special adviser on the prevention of genocide who called the crisis in the country “one of the worst human rights and humanitarian crises of our time.”

The conflict’s toll is difficult to determine as the most vicious attacks have taken place in remote villages. About 1 in 10 people have been displaced from their homes, according to international aid group Doctors Without Borders.

Details only trickle in when survivors make their way to safety and the insecurity in the region makes it impossible for aid groups to determine how many have died. And many of the rebels accused of  atrocities have been integrated into the national army, rendering the country’s security forces unable to combat the cycle of violence.

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