Valdosta Daily Times

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October 11, 2013

Canada’s Alice Munro wins Nobel literature prize

STOCKHOLM — If there were a literary award bigger than the Nobel Prize, Alice Munro would probably win that, too.

“Among writers, her name is spoken in hushed tones,” fellow Canadian author Margaret Atwood once wrote. “She’s the kind of writer about whom it is often said — no matter how well known she becomes — that she ought to be better known.”

Munro, 82, was awarded literature’s highest honor Thursday, saluted by the Nobel committee as a thorough but forgiving chronicler of the human spirit, and her selection marks a number of breakthroughs.

She is the first winner of the $1.2 million prize to be fully identified with Canada. Saul Bellow won in 1976, but though he was born in Canada, he moved to the U.S. as a boy and is more closely associated with Chicago.

Munro is also the rare author to win for short stories.

“When I began writing there was a very small community of Canadian writers and little attention was paid by the world. Now Canadian writers are read, admired and respected around the globe,” Munro said in a statement issued by her publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. She said she hopes the Nobel “fosters further interest in all Canadian writers” and “brings further recognition to the short story form.”

Her books having sold more than 1 million copies in the U.S. alone, she has long been an international ambassador for the short story, proof that the narrative arc and depth of characterization expected from a novel can be realized in just 30 to 40 pages.

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