Valdosta Daily Times

Top News

November 6, 2012

Obama, Romney pursue last votes in deadlocked race

SANFORD, Fla. — One day left in their stubbornly deadlocked race, President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney are storming through a final exhaustive campaign push Monday that won’t end until the wee hours of Election Day in pursuit of every possible vote.

Both candidates say the winner will be determined by which of their operations can get the most supporters to the polls. “This is going to be a turnout election,” the president declared in an interview airing Monday morning as he pleaded with urban radio listeners to get to the polls.

“We have one job left,” and that’s getting people out to vote, Romney told more than a thousand people just off the tarmac at the airport in Sanford, Fla. The crowd chanted “One more day!”

With national polls showing a neck-and-neck race, the final day’s schedule showed where the two campaigns believe the race will be decided. Romney was in Florida, Virginia, and New Hampshire, while Obama was trying to protect Wisconsin from an eleventh-hour challenge from the GOP before heading to Iowa.

And in an indication of just how all-important Ohio was once again to the future occupancy of the White House, both candidates planned to be on the ground in Columbus Monday evening for dueling rallies seven miles apart.

Whoever wins Ohio has a simpler path to amass the 270 electoral votes needed to claim the presidency. With Obama showing a lead in most polls of the state’s likely voters, Romney voiced guarded optimism Sunday in Cleveland, saying Obama’s re-election is “possible, but not likely.”

Obama also raised the possibility of defeat as he pleaded with listeners of The Rickey Smiley Morning Show to get to the polls. “If we don’t turn out the vote, we could lose a lot of the gains we’ve already made,” Obama said.

It was one of two of the president’s radio interviews airing Monday aimed at turning out minority voters, the other with a Spanish-language station in Ohio. The president is relying on black and Hispanic voters to help offset Romney’s lead with white men in particular, but the risk for him is that some of those key supporters aren’t as motivated to vote as they were in 2008.

“Four years ago, we had incredible turnout and I know people were excited and energized about the prospect of making history,” Obama said. “We have to preserve the gains we’ve made and keep moving forward.”

Both candidates will also benefit from some star power Monday. Rock legend Bruce Springsteen is joining Obama at all three campaign rallies, and rapper Jay-Z will join him in Columbus. Romney planned a final rally in the last hour of election eve in New Hampshire with Kid Rock while country rock performers The Marshall Tucker Band was joining him in Columbus.

A final national NBC/Wall Street Journal Poll showed Obama getting the support of 48 percent of likely voters, with Romney receiving 47 percent. A Washington Post-ABC News tracking poll had Obama at 49 and Romney at 48. A Pew Research Center poll released Sunday showed Obama with a 3-point-point edge over Romney, 48 percent to 45 percent among likely voters.

Defying the odds, Romney drew one of his largest crowds Sunday in Pennsylvania, a state where Obama was holding onto a lead but where Romney aides said they detected soft support for the president. Despite a delayed arrival, Romney rallied thousands on a farm in a Philadelphia suburb on a cold night, taking the podium as loudspeakers blared the theme from “Rocky.” The sign of energy in a key swing area of the state was only tempered by some early exits by supporters seeking to escape the cold.

Obama dispatched former President Bill Clinton to Pennsylvania on Monday for an eleventh-hour bid to keep the state in his column.

Meanwhile, about 30 million people have already voted in 34 states and the District of Columbia, either by mail or in person, although none will be counted until Election Day on Tuesday. More than 4 million of the ballots were cast in Florida, where Democrats filed a lawsuit demanding an extension of available time. A judge granted their request in one county where an early voting site was shut down for several hours Saturday because of a bomb scare.

Both men were spending the final days of the campaign presenting themselves as can-do leaders willing to break partisan logjams in Washington.

The former Massachusetts governor warned that a second Obama term would threaten the American economy because of the president’s inability to work with Congress. “He’s ignored them, he’s attacked them, he’s blamed them,” Romney said.

Obama cited bipartisan work on middle-class tax cuts and on ending the Pentagon’s don’t-ask-don’t-tell policy, but warned that he would not compromise away his priorities, such as health care. “I’m not willing to pay that price,” he said.

As aides for both candidates looked for early marks of success, there were signs for the superstitious. Since 1936, with only one exception, whenever the Washington Redskins won on the Sunday before the election, the incumbent party would retain the White House. On Sunday, the Redskins lost to the Carolina Panthers, giving hope to Republicans.

But the Obama camp often compares this election to 2004, when President George W. Bush held the White House in his race against Democrat John Kerry. That year was the exception to the rule; the Redskins lost, and so did Kerry.

1
Text Only
Top News
  • Color Me Free fun run planned

    South Georgia House of Hope is having a Color Me Free 5k Fun Run/Walk April 26 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., to emphasize Alcohol Awareness Month. All funds raised will benefit South Georgia House of Hope, which is a long-term residential home for women recovering from drug and alcohol addiction and abuse.

    April 18, 2014

  • Another arrest made in kidnapping

    Another arrest was made in the kidnapping of a North Carolina prosecutor’s father, federal investigators said Thursday.
    Quantavious Thompson was taken into custody late Wednesday afternoon, FBI spokeswoman Shelley Lynch said in a statement. Details on his arrest weren’t immediately available.

    April 18, 2014

  • Firetruck answering call slams into restaurant

    April 17, 2014

  • Bat Fungus1.jpg Bat-killing fungus spreads in Georgia

    Black Diamond Tunnel sits just outside the city of Clayton in the northeast corner of Georgia. Today, the man-made tunnel is the state’s largest known winter shelter for some of Georgia’s 16 bat species. It’s also the latest site in the state to fall victim to white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that’s killed more than 6 million bats in the eastern half of the U.S.

    April 17, 2014 3 Photos

  • Odd Claw Machine Todd.jpg Nebraska toddler gets stuck inside claw machine

    Authorities say a toddler has been reunited with his mother after employees found him playing inside a claw crane machine at a Nebraska bowling alley.

    April 17, 2014 1 Photo

  • Boston Marathon_Stew.jpg Boston Marathon organizers confident of safe race

    The arrest of a man with a rice cooker in his backpack near the Boston Marathon finish line led police to step up patrols Wednesday, while organizers sought to assure the city and runners of a safe race next week.

    April 17, 2014 1 Photo

  • APTOPIX Ukraine_Stew.jpg Combat vehicles in east Ukraine fly Russian flag

    A column of armored vehicles flying Russian flags drove into a Ukrainian city controlled by pro-Russian insurgents Wednesday, dampening the central government’s hopes of re-establishing control over restive eastern Ukraine.

    April 17, 2014 1 Photo

  • S. Ga. river flood warning issued

    S. Ga. river flood warning issued

    April 17, 2014

  • Detroit still needs $350M from state lawmakers

    Pressure was building Wednesday for Michigan lawmakers to commit $350 million to Detroit pensions, a day after the city reached tentative agreements with pension funds and a retiree group to reduce payouts.

    April 17, 2014

  • China’s growth slows to 7.4 percent in 1Q

    China’s economic growth slowed further in the latest quarter but appeared strong enough to satisfy Chinese leaders who are trying to put the country on a more sustainable path without politically dangerous job losses.

    April 17, 2014

Top News
Poll

What you think about school and workplace rules about Facebook friends?

There have to be rules.
No need for rules, just use common sense.
If people want to be friends, what is the big deal?
Nobody uses Facebook anymore.
     View Results