Valdosta Daily Times

March 1, 2013

Today in History for Friday, March 1, 2013


The Associated Press

-- — Highlight in History

On March 1, 1790, President George Washington signed a measure authorizing the first U.S. Census.



On this date

In 1565, the city of Rio de Janeiro was founded by Portuguese knight Estacio de Sa.

In 1867, Nebraska became the 37th state.

In 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant signed an act creating Yellowstone National Park.

In 1890, J.P. Lippincott published the first U.S. edition of the Sherlock Holmes mystery “A Study in Scarlet” by Arthur Conan Doyle.

In 1913, American author Ralph Ellison (“Invisible Man”) was born in Oklahoma City. (Some sources list 1914.)

In 1932, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., the 20-month-old son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, was kidnapped from the family home near Hopewell, N.J. (Remains identified as those of the child were found the following May.)

In 1940, “Native Son” by Richard Wright was first published by Harper & Brothers.

In 1943, wartime rationing of processed foods under a point system began in the U.S.

In 1954, Puerto Rican nationalists opened fire from the gallery of the U.S. House of Representatives, wounding five congressmen.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy signed an executive order establishing the Peace Corps.

In 1971, a bomb went off inside a men’s room at the U.S. Capitol; the radical group Weather Underground claimed responsibility for the pre-dawn blast.

In 1981, Irish Republican Army member Bobby Sands began a hunger strike at the Maze Prison in Northern Ireland; he died 65 days later.



Ten years ago

Suspected 9/11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed was captured by CIA and Pakistani agents. Iraq began complying with orders from U.N. weapons inspectors to destroy its Al Samoud II missiles. The United Arab Emirates called for Saddam Hussein to step down, the first Arab country to do so publicly. Turkey’s parliament dealt a stunning blow to U.S. war planning by failing to approve a bill allowing in American combat troops to open a northern front against Iraq.



Five years ago

President George W. Bush, speaking at his Texas ranch, declined to promise more U.S. troop withdrawals from Iraq before leaving, underscoring the need for a strong military presence during Iraqi provincial elections. The USS New York, an amphibious assault ship built with scrap steel from the ruins of the World Trade Center, was christened at Avondale, La. Raul Reyes, the No. 2 commander of the Colombian rebel group FARC, was slain during a cross-border raid into Ecuador by Colombian security forces. New York’s famed Plaza Hotel reopened after a three-year, $400 million renovation.



One year ago

Senate Democrats narrowly blocked, 51-48, an effort by Republicans to overturn President Barack Obama’s order that most employers or their insurers cover the cost of contraceptives. Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley signed a measure legalizing same-sex marriage.