Valdosta Daily Times

March 10, 2013

Today in History for Sunday, March 10, 2013


The Associated Press

-- — Highlight in History

On March 10, 1913, former slave, abolitionist and Underground Railroad “conductor” Harriet Tubman died in Auburn, N.Y.; she was in her 90s.



On this date

In 1785, Thomas Jefferson was appointed America’s minister to France, succeeding Benjamin Franklin.

In 1863, Edward, the Prince of Wales (and future King Edward VII), married Princess Alexandra of Denmark at Windsor Castle.

In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell’s assistant, Thomas Watson, heard Bell say over his experimental telephone: “Mr. Watson — come here — I want to see you.”

In 1880, the Salvation Army arrived in the United States from England.

In 1893, Ivory Coast became a French colony.

In 1949, Nazi wartime broadcaster Mildred E. Gillars, also known as “Axis Sally,” was convicted in Washington, D.C., of treason. (She served 12 years in prison.)

In 1969, James Earl Ray pleaded guilty in Memphis, Tenn., to assassinating civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. (Ray later repudiated that plea, maintaining his innocence until his death.)

In 1973, the Pink Floyd album “The Dark Side of the Moon” was first released in the U.S. by Capitol Records (the British release came nearly two weeks later).

In 1985, Konstantin U. Chernenko, who was the Soviet Union’s leader for just 13 months, died at age 73.

In 1988, prior to the 50th anniversary of the Anschluss, Austrian President Kurt Waldheim apologized on his country’s behalf for atrocities committed by Austrian Nazis. Pop singer Andy Gibb died in Oxford, England, of heart inflammation five days after turning 30.

In 1993, Dr. David Gunn was shot to death outside a Pensacola, Fla., abortion clinic. (Shooter Michael Griffin is serving a life sentence.)



Ten years ago

Facing almost certain defeat, the United States and Britain delayed a vote in the U.N. Security Council to give Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein an ultimatum to disarm. Natalie Maines, lead singer of the Dixie Chicks, told a London audience: “Just so you know... we’re ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas.” (Maines later apologized for the phrasing of her remark.)



Five years ago

A suicide bomber killed five U.S. soldiers as they chatted with shop owners while on a foot patrol in central Baghdad. New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer apologized after allegations surfaced that he had paid thousands of dollars for a high-end call girl; he did not elaborate on the scandal, which drew calls for his resignation. Democrat Barack Obama ridiculed the idea of being Hillary Rodham Clinton’s running mate, saying in Columbus, Miss., that voters had to choose between the two for the top spot on the fall ticket.



One year ago

Rick Santorum won the Kansas caucuses in a rout and Republican presidential front-runner Mitt Romney countered in Wyoming. Israel pounded Gaza for a second day, trading airstrikes and rocket fire with Palestinian militants, killing 15 of them. F. Sherwood Rowland, 84, the Nobel prize-winning chemist who sounded the alarm on the thinning of the Earth’s ozone layer, died in Corona del Mar, Calif.