Valdosta Daily Times

April 1, 2013

Today in History for Monday, April 1, 2013


The Associated Press

-- — Highlight in History

On April 1, 1789, the U.S. House of Representatives held its first full meeting in New York; Frederick Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania was elected the first House speaker.



On this date

In 1853, Cincinnati, Ohio, established a fire department made up of paid city employees.

In 1912, the city of Branson, Mo., was incorporated.

In 1933, Nazi Germany staged a daylong national boycott of Jewish-owned businesses.

In 1939, the United States recognized the government of Gen. Francisco Franco in Spain, the same day Franco went on radio to declare victory in the Spanish Civil War.

In 1945, American forces launched the amphibious invasion of Okinawa during World War II.

In 1962, the Katherine Anne Porter novel “Ship of Fools,” an allegory about the rise of Nazism in Germany, was published by Little, Brown & Co. on April Fool’s Day.

In 1963, New York City’s daily newspapers resumed publishing after settlement was reached in a 114-day strike. The daytime drama “General Hospital” premiered on ABC-TV.

In 1972, the first Major League Baseball players’ strike began; it lasted 12 days.

In 1976, Apple Computer was founded by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne.

In 1983, tens of thousands of anti-nuclear demonstrators linked arms in a 14-mile human chain spanning three defense installations in rural England, including the Greenham Common U.S. Air Base.

In 1984, recording star Marvin Gaye was shot to death by his father, Marvin Gay Sr. in Los Angeles, the day before his 45th birthday. (The elder Gay pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter, and received probation.)

In 1992, the National Hockey League Players’ Association went on its first-ever strike, which lasted 10 days.



Ten years ago

American troops entered a hospital in Nasiriyah, Iraq, and rescued Army Pfc. Jessica Lynch, who’d been held prisoner since her unit was ambushed on March 23. A Cuban plane hijacked the day before with 32 people aboard landed at Key West, Fla., where the hijacker surrendered.



Five years ago

The Pentagon made public a memo dated March 14, 2003, that approved the use of harsh interrogation techniques against terror suspects, saying that President George W. Bush’s wartime authority trumped any international ban on torture. (The memo was rescinded in December 2003.) Top executives of the country’s biggest oil companies told Congress they knew record fuel prices were hurting people, but argued it wasn’t their fault and that their huge profits were in line with other industries.



One year ago

A coalition of more than 70 partners, including the United States, pledged to send millions of dollars to Syria’s opposition groups. Myanmar’s democracy icon, Aung San Suu Kyi, was elected to her country’s parliament. Former Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid died at age 77. Taylor Swift won her second consecutive entertainer of the year award at the Academy of Country Music Awards.