Valdosta Daily Times

February 8, 2013

HOPE will be expanded for tech grants


The Associated Press

ATLANTA — Gov. Nathan Deal and state lawmakers have reached an agreement to lower the grade requirements to qualify for HOPE grants at Georgia technical schools.

The Republican governor was surrounded by legislators from both parties Thursday when he said the threshold will be returned to a 2.0 grade point average, a move that stands to benefit several thousand students at an estimated cost of $5 million to $8 million annually.

Lawmakers raised the requirement to a 3.0 two years ago during a time of sagging lottery revenues and long-term forecasts of HOPE insolvency, but Deal said an uptick in lottery proceeds allows for the flexibility.

“This will help Georgia families that are trying to get ahead and help with our work force development,” Deal said, noting that technical college enrollment had dropped considerably since lawmakers raised the standards.

Rep. Stacey Evans, a Smyrna Democrat, said, “The difference in these students getting this grant and not getting this grant is the difference in them having a ticket into the middle class.”

The change will require a legislative act, but Deal’s event, which included House Speaker David Ralston, Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and several committee chairmen, made clear that the bill will experience smooth sailing. The changes will not affect requirements for HOPE grants to four-year schools.

Despite the bipartisan scene in the governor’s office, there was subtle political gamesmanship over who should get credit for the expansion. Democrats have called for it since eligibility was tightened, and Senate Democrats in particularly have made HOPE expansion part of their session agenda.