Valdosta Daily Times

National, International News

January 28, 2014

Today in History for Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014

-- — Highlight in History

On Jan. 28, 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, killing all seven crew members, including schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe.

On this date

In A.D. 814, Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne died in Aachen in present-day Germany.

In 1547, England’s King Henry VIII died; he was succeeded by his 9-year-old son, Edward VI.

In 1813, the novel “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen was first published anonymously in London.

In 1853, Cuban revolutionary Jose Marti was born in Havana.

In 1915, the United States Coast Guard was created as President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill merging the Life-Saving Service and Revenue Cutter Service.

In 1939, Irish poet-dramatist William Butler Yeats died in Menton, France.

In 1945, during World War II, Allied supplies began reaching China over the newly reopened Burma Road.

In 1980, six United States diplomats who had avoided being taken hostage at their embassy in Tehran were flown out of Iran with the help of Canadian diplomats.

Ten years ago

British Prime Minister Tony Blair won a legal victory when a judge said the BBC was wrong to report the government had “sexed up” intelligence to justify war in Iraq. Former U.S. Navy commander Lloyd “Pete” Bucher, who’d helped his USS Pueblo crew survive brutal captivity in North Korea, then faced criticism back home, died in Poway, Calif., at age 76.

Five years ago

In a swift victory for President Barack Obama, the Democratic-controlled House approved, 244-188, a huge $819 billion stimulus bill with Republicans unanimous in opposition despite Obama’s pleas for bipartisan support. Lynyrd Skynyrd keyboard player Billy Powell, who survived the 1977 plane crash that killed three band members, died in Orange Park, Fla., at age 56.

One year ago

Side by side, leading Democratic and Republican senators pledged to propel far-reaching immigration legislation through the Senate by summer, providing a possible path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people in the U.S. illegally. (Although the Senate did pass such a measure, it has encountered opposition from House Republicans who insist on a more limited approach.)

Backed by French helicopters and paratroopers, Malian soldiers entered the fabled city of Timbuktu after al-Qaida-linked militants who’d ruled the outpost by fear for nearly 10 months fled into the desert.

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