Valdosta Daily Times

Features

May 16, 2014

A mom, a printer, and the new digital ease of counterfeiting

- — Tarshema Brice hardly ranks among the world's elite counterfeiters. But with the help of modern consumer technology, she developed an exacting system for crafting fake U.S. greenbacks.



First, the 34-year-old hairstylist and janitor took $5 bills with a specific watermark and soaked them with "Purple Power" degreaser. Next, she scrubbed off the ink with a toothbrush. After drying the now-blank notes with a hair dryer, she fed them through a Hewlett-Packard 3-in-1 inkjet printer that emblazoned them with scanned images of $50 or $100 bills.

The counterfeits looked and felt real and could pass any rudimentary test by a retail clerk. Brice, who pleaded guilty to counterfeiting last month in federal court, admits she produced $10,000 to $20,000 in fake bills over two years before her scam unraveled in September. The Richmond, Virginia, resident "was raising six children on her own with modest income and was filling the gaps by making counterfeit money," says her lawyer, Charles James.

Brice's scam is emblematic of a modern twist in a crime as old as money itself: digital technology has revolutionized the counterfeiting craft. Not long ago, producing good fakes was the province of artisans who etched printing plates and churned out millions in bogus bills on off-set presses. Today, all it takes is a scanner, a color printer and, for best results, some small bills and household cleaner.

"Back in the day, there was a significant outlay of funds to produce a counterfeit note," said Ed Lowery, the agent in charge of the Secret Service's criminal division. "You had to buy lots of quality paper, the ink, the printing press. You didn't print up a thousand at a time, you printed up four or five million. You had a distribution network."

Text Only
Features
Top News
Poll

Do you agree with the millage rate increases?

Yes. We need to maintain services
No. Services should have been cut.
     View Results